Matt Gerchow Interviews Mykola Bashlakov

Matt Gerchow Interviews Mykola Bashlakov
Matt Gerchow Interviews Mykola Bashlakov

 

Transcription

Matt Gerchow:
Okay, so here we are at Gameofmarketing.com, and today we’ve got Mykola Bashlakovashlakov, from the Ukraine, who’s living here in Austin, Texas. Welcome, Mykola.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Thank you, Matt. It’s a pleasure to be here.

Matt Gerchow:
All right. So we met at an Austin marketing conference that I attended last minute and you were there, and I saw you kind of working the room. And we talked a little bit about what you were doing. And it was kind of similar to one of our gigs, and so I was really interested in just kind of the journey you guys are on, you and your partner, and how it was all coming to be. And so I wanted to have you on so we could do this interview just to kind of delve into it a little bit more. And you know, kind of get the word out about your product out there to the internet. So, what is it that you would say is your primary focus right now? Is it Snaplitics?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yes, that takes most of my time. And that’s what I invest the majority of my resources and my time and my effort and my passion.

Matt Gerchow:
Awesome, man. So I have a pretty good idea of what Snaplitics is, why don’t you give me the two minute explanation of what Snaplitics is and what problems in the market it’s going after?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, of course, sure. Probably the best slogan that I can use to describe Snaplitics is the website builder that doesn’t suck.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay.

Mykola Bashlakov:
If I were to take a look at the majority of the website builders out there such as Wix or Weebly or Squarespace or GoDaddy website builder, these are the four biggest ones, I really get dissatisfied with what they offered in the market. They offer website building solutions that are very restrictive in terms of what you can do with them. They have some layout limitations, you’re locked in a template. The websites they produce are not very productive, they’re not fast, they’re not optimized for search engine optimization. And they just don’t really allow for that much success to happen. I mean, if you take a look at a Wix website it takes 10 seconds for it to show up. If you have a Facebook ad or a Google AdWords ad going to that website, then you’re going to waste a lot of ad money, right?

Matt Gerchow:
Sure.

Mykola Bashlakov:
If somebody has to wait 10 seconds for a website to pull up, or they’re on their phone and the website says not responsive, like a lot of these websites are, you basically are wasting ad money and you’re not getting anywhere you need to get your business going forward. [crosstalk 00:02:57]

Matt Gerchow:
Sure. Mykola, what would you say is the major difference between Snaplitics and, say, Wix?

Mykola Bashlakov:
The biggest difference, the biggest advantage I would say that we have is that we actually want to be a business solution, a business effective solution, the solution that will be bringing profitability, that will be bringing increase in [inaudible 00:03:21] and will be increasing results to the business owner.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Whoever is the one using the platform. If it’s the business owner using or if that’s the website designer or if that’s a marketing agency using the platform, we understand that the whole reason of it is to bring more money to the business, to bring more leads, to bring more clients. To bring higher SEO performance, to bring better user experience.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. So maybe if you boiled it down, you would say it’s more conversion and revenue potential or revenue garnering than Wix?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yes, yes. And the way it achieves it is that allows you to make much faster websites, our websites pull up in two or three seconds. We have excellent Google based speed scores, we have base speed scores of 80 and above. People switch to use from Squarespace and Weebly and they go up from base speed score of 40 or 50, they shoot up to 80, 85, 87, 90. And of course, the website becomes faster and the website goes up in the search rankings. We have a small business based up in Idaho who switched to using us and they went up from Google local search position number four to position number one.

Matt Gerchow:
Oh, that’s fantastic.

Mykola Bashlakov:
The store owner is having trouble, he doesn’t have any space to sell the stock that he needs because the demand is so high now. It’s a good problem to have.

Matt Gerchow:
Let’s back up a little bit and let’s talk. This website is about the game of marketing, so we know you guys have the great product or you wouldn’t be on the show. Let’s talk a little bit about you. So, you’re originally from the Ukraine?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yes, correct.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. And what year did you come to the U.S.?

Mykola Bashlakov:
I came to the U.S. about a year ago.

Matt Gerchow:
Oh, only one year ago?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yes.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. And you were in the Ukraine the entire time before that, or other countries as well?

Mykola Bashlakov:
I lived in the UK before that as well, but for the majority of my life, yes, I lived in Ukraine.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. And so Snaplitics has been around since what year?

Mykola Bashlakov:
It’s been around since 2016, late 2016 is when the company was founded. And we launched our first version of the product in the start of this year. And ever since we’ve worked on improving. We kind of put it on the market and had a proof of concept of ourselves. We’ve seen some really happy customers, we’ve seen where we need to improve. And we’ve got a version two launch coming up in a couple of weeks. I’m not giving any release dates, but it’s going to be up in a couple of weeks. That’s what I would say. We made some drastic improvements to it, we changed our pricing model. We’re going to have a freemium plan.

Matt Gerchow:
Now, did Snaplitics used to be called Site Builder Pro?

Mykola Bashlakov:
No.

Matt Gerchow:
No. Okay, I must have saw that, I thought I saw that on Sean’s LinkedIn profile. Like SiteBuilder.Pro or something like that.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Oh yes, yes. With a certain name called SnapBuilder.Pro.

Matt Gerchow:
SnapBuilder.Pro. Thank you.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s a name that was considered. But it never rolled out under that name.

Matt Gerchow:
Got it.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That was just part of our internal name decision.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. And so, one of the things that we like to share with our viewers, and I probably should have given you a little more heads up on this, but we like to talk about the DMO. And that’s the daily method of operations. Which, maybe just kind of, what does your day consist of? Are you in the office at 10:00, are you there at 7:00? Are you there until 10:00pm or are you out of there at 4:00pm? Would you consider yourself more of the workaholic type? You know, how do you drive your day?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, I would say I’m in the office normally from about 9:30 or 10:00am, and until about 8:00pm.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay, awesome.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s my typical office day. Monday through Friday, and I often work on Sundays as well. Saturday I take off. And Sunday is a work [inaudible 00:07:51] office. But yes, I would consider myself a workaholic because I do tend to do some work pretty much everyday, and most of the days I do work pretty intensely.

Matt Gerchow:
I can see that.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, a lot of things to do. If you’re running, you’re trying to grow a company, you have to manage all the things at once. There’s nobody else other than you who’s responsible. So if anything goes wrong you need to be on it.

Matt Gerchow:
Now, one of the things that I think you could probably comment well on is the quote unquote American Dream of coming to America, starting a business, being able to make millions of dollars, or whatever the number is that you’re after. How’s it treating you so far?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, I would say that it’s quite good. I would say that when I came to the United States I had a slightly different vision of what I thought it would be to what it turned out to be.

Matt Gerchow:
And what did you think it was going to be?

Mykola Bashlakov:
What did I think it was going to be? Well, the country I come from, a lot of people are very dreaming about United States and a lot of them are just dreaming to leave Ukraine and go to the U.S. and they don’t really know what it’s about. They just think it’s going to be better 100%. In any shape or dimension. I never had that vision. I was always skeptical about things. I would always be very alert about things. And I was never, I’ve never been falling in love with the U.S. I never have. At this moment I don’t really have an immigrant intention, I’m in the U.S. in a non-immigrant status right now. I’m in a treaty investor status here that allows me to grow my business, but I don’t want to have a permanent residency in this country. And at this moment I’m not intending obtaining one. I consider myself to be more of a world citizen. I consider myself to do business globally. And I don’t want to restrict myself to a particular country.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s how I’d put it.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, yeah. Well, what I’ve noticed in our business, I have about a 50/50 mix of people in the U.S. and then people overseas. And I’ve noticed that, at least for myself, the people I have overseas seem to take their jobs really, really seriously. They get up, they work hard, they put in the long hours and they produce. Where my U.S. based people are kind of struggling with different things. It could be drug addictions, alcohol addictions, too much TV, too much leisure, too many holidays, et cetera.

And I was listening to Grant Cardone and Gary Vaynerchuk speaking the other day and they made a comment that kind of stuck with me. Is they said that they’ll choose the immigrant anytime over the person natively born here in this country. And it’s just based on simple work ethic. I found that kind of interesting because I’ve kind of experienced the same thing. And it’s just kind of interesting to reflect on that. I’ve had to, you know, I’m born here in this country, but I’ve noticed that I’m a lot different than the majority of the people here as well. So it’s just kind of an interesting topic to talk to.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, my personal vision on that is I never want to judge people by their nationality or which country they’ve been born in. You don’t get to pick where you’re born. You’re born in a certain country and that’s just an accident of where you happen to born, right? And I personally don’t think that you should judge people’s personalities or their work ethics by where they’re born. What you describe about [inaudible 00:12:12].

Matt Gerchow:
Your mic’s breaking up a little bit.

Mykola Bashlakov:
You hear? You hear me?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, I’m wondering if it might be, I think it might be rubbing on your shirt.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Right. Okay, I’m going to hold it like this.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Is that better?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, it is actually. I thought you were rubbing a pencil or something on the table because it kept making this …

Mykola Bashlakov:
I tell you I wasn’t. You know, my vision is that there are different sort of people everywhere. The people who you mentioned, drug addiction, alcohol addiction, too much TV, too much something, not much work, there are people like that in every country in the world.

Matt Gerchow:
Sure.

Mykola Bashlakov:
And people like that in my home country. And I would say that probably the only difference is that people in my home country have way less money than people who live in the U.S. do. But other than that, it’s pretty much the same. There are different kind of people. Why it might seem like immigrants are more hard working or more into putting more hours, well, that’s just the case that they probably have more courage and more of an open-minded thinking than those people who choose to stay in their home country.

Matt Gerchow:
In their home country, yeah.

Mykola Bashlakov:
They’re just more risk-taking, they’re more independent in how they think, and that’s why they probably appear more hard working.

Matt Gerchow:
So, you came to the U.S. Why didn’t you just take a job? Why become an entrepreneur? I mean, it’s definitely not the easier route.

Mykola Bashlakov:
No, it’s not an easier route. But I never choose what seems to be easy. That’s not how I make decisions. That’s just not my decision-making process. I do not decide things by this is easy, I’ll do it. I decide things by, this is something that I think is a good thing to do, this will produce some good results and this is something I would like to do. [inaudible 00:14:23] people who are working as employees and they’re working wonderful jobs. But also I know people who work as entrepreneurs and they do stuff well, and there are a lot of entrepreneurs who don’t do stuff well. Other entrepreneurs are being way too chaotic and don’t get a structured process laid out. So it just really depends on what you can do and what you want to do and what are you able to do. But that’s how I made my decision, I realized that I’m good at structuring the process and making things happen. And I thought, well, I’ll give it a go. And so far it’s been working pretty well.

Matt Gerchow:
Now, would you say that the ultimate goal of Snaplitics would be sell the company?

Mykola Bashlakov:
I personally do not have an intention to sell my company yet. Obviously I don’t want to reveal anything that might cause any controversy around it. But at the moment, there are no plans on [crosstalk 00:15:23].

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, the reason that I ask that is kind of in relation to the job question. Did you see a bigger payout in having your own company than working for an Amazon or a Google, et cetera?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Oh yeah, of course. I see a much bigger payout and I see a lot more freedom for myself in what I can do. And a lot more enjoyment and emotional satisfaction out of it. It comes with a lot of responsibility, it comes with a lot of stress, and I’m sure, Matt, that you know that because you have your own businesses and you know what it is like to be a business owner. And we both know it. So, it’s a decision that you make. And once you make that decision, never go back, right?

Matt Gerchow:
Never go back. Yeah, I have not had a job with a W2 since 2001. So it’s been a little while now. And I don’t think I could go back. I think I’m so broken to the traditional model. One of the things, one of the sayings I like is they say, “That to be a successful entrepreneur you have to be able to be off-balance, off-kilter, and still make rational decisions in the middle of chaos.” And I think that it’s as we get better at doing that we have more successful companies.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, you need to be able to make decisions under stress.

Matt Gerchow:
Yes, that’s essentially the same thing. So, one of the questions that I had for Sean was about his kind of aha moment with SnapPlayer. And what happened there was he got really sick of being forced to watch through videos. And he wanted to create this chapter capability. And I took a look at it, and it’s really nice looking technology. Is there an aha moment or a discovery moment behind Snaplitics that caused you guys to go after this web builder market?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, surely. The SnapPlayer is something that has been kind of on hold for now, but we still plan on releasing at some point. But just it wasn’t that high on our priority list as Snaplitics was, so that hasn’t died yet. SnapPlayer was Sean’s idea and he pitched it down here in Austin in September last year. That’s where I met him. And that’s where we started talking, that’s where we started working on things. At some point Sean has realized the tremendous opportunity that Snaplitics has had and we’re thinking driving to pick up some food in a drive through. So Sean has realized why he was so excited, he was telling me about it, he was almost screaming and jumping up and down as he was driving the car. He comes to the drive through, ordered the food, paid for it, and left.

Matt Gerchow:
Forgot the food?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah.

Matt Gerchow:
That’s awesome.

Mykola Bashlakov:
So he was that excited. That’s how I would tell you, but that’s the aha that he had.

Matt Gerchow:
That’s awesome. So he knew from that moment forward that because of this excitement level, that this was the right direction?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yep. And then I had everything analyzed, I had the analysis performed, analyzed the competitor website builders. And I had my own my aha as well. The ahas that I have are a little more cold blooded than he has, but that’s how we work. That’s our work style, I would say. He gets an idea, he likes to get an idea, he likes to get excited about it. And I like to go ahead and do a hard fact check analysis and everything and make sure it’s all coherent and consistent. And then I say, “Yes, this is consistent.” And kind of clean things up a little bit and then move forward. That’s how we work. And I think that’s probably why we make such a good [inaudible 00:19:27].

Matt Gerchow:
So, one of the metrics from owning a similar business, one of the metrics that stood out is there’s 69 million WordPress installs. Are there any other metrics that were really exciting to you guys?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, metrics of number of websites using Wix and Weebly. There’s over two million Wix websites. There’s about 700,000 Weebly websites. There’s over a million Squarespace websites. When we looked at it and we realized, you know, if we can provide something better then we can get at least a certain percentage of their clients, then we’re going to be happy, right? And then once we get to that number, that crucial minimum number, we can go and scale up a little more and more.

Matt Gerchow:
Yep.

Mykola Bashlakov:
We’d get to a point where we’re as big as them. It’s obviously early status yet, and I can not make any claims that are too big at this stage, but that’s for sure something that will be nice to consider for us.

Matt Gerchow:
So, if someone was getting started as an internet marketer, or a company that was going to need your services, what are some of the tips that you would give them towards starting their business?

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s a good question. The tips I’ll give to starting a business, really speaking from what I’ve experienced, the best thing to have is to have a client and to work a solution around the client. And then try and replicate a solution to other clients. That’s the better portion. Actually, trying to understand what the customer wants from you, trying to provide the service or the product that that customer exactly needs and actually solve the problem to them.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah.

Mykola Bashlakov:
And being able to describe how your solution is able to justify its economic efficiency in the eyes of the business owner for the cost that you are asking it for. And then once you’re able to answer this question, you can formulate a great message. You can create a product or service offering. And go to Snaplitics.com, create your website, create some landing pages, put some ads [inaudible 00:21:53], do some press releases. The press releases I think are very good. I didn’t see much value in them when I just started, but once I started using them, probably the best returns on them. They’re free as well, you can produce your own press release. And you don’t have to use something like PR [inaudible 00:22:08], you can just reach out to writers directly. And that’s actually what we do.

Matt Gerchow:
You reach out to them directly and then they do the press release on their own?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, they’ll create an article out of your press release. That’s something that we’ve done. That’s how we approach these, we do not hire any kind of PR service, we do it all in house.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. That’s a good tip.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s another small tip. You know, formulate that and put it out and just wait for people to come in. Wait for more clients to come in. And as they come in, adjust it, adjust your message, adjust your offering, clear up your [inaudible 00:22:45] just to fit the needs better. Figure out what’s your best niche, figure out what’s your best KPI [inaudible 00:22:52] for the client. And then just hammer on it. That’s the thing where we are at right now. We’ve been through that, we’ve seen which KPIs are the best. We’ve seen where we are the leader, we are the leader in website optimization, website speed. And the actual business success of our customers comes from that. And we decide that it’s our niche and we’re going to hammer on it. And that’s what I recommend to a lot of business owners as well.

Matt Gerchow:
Yep. I like it, I like everything I’m hearing. So, let me ask you this. Who else in the Austin market do you think my viewers would benefit by seeing an interview with?

Mykola Bashlakov:
I don’t fully understand your question.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, who else do you think I should interview in this market here?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Who else you should interview? That’s a good question. You want to be in Austin or nation-wide?

Matt Gerchow:
Nation-wide.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Nation-wide. Well, I would recommend Eric Cawley of Complete Marketing Solutions. I think he’d be pretty interesting. He’s a small business marketing service, a complete marketing strategist. And I think a lot of your viewers will really like some tips that he gives. We used a lot of his tips and we got somewhere pretty well.

Another person that I can think of, a Mr. [Conrad Igusa? 00:24:14], the CEO of [inaudible 00:24:19]. He has given a press strategy class that I’ve learned a lot out of. He’s very good at this. So, these are the people I think would be very good for you to use.

Matt Gerchow:
Awesome.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Another person I can think of, perhaps, Mr. Frank Shines. He is more analytics background. He has a very extensive background in artificial intelligence, analytics. And he is actually [inaudible 00:24:48] create his own service offering where he uses AI and uses analytics, machine learning to actually improve the marketing for the small business. So that’s something you might want to get interested in as well. I can provide you email addresses after the interview.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, that’d be great. That would be great. So, I think that’s about it for our interview. Thank you so much for coming on the show. And where can people reach you?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Well, they can always come into our office at 701 Tillery Street in Austin, Texas.

Matt Gerchow:
How about an email address?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Sure. I can give you my email address, it’s mb, M for Mike, B for Bravo, at snaplitics.com.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay, awesome. And the website is Snaplitics with an I. S-N-A-P-L-I-T-I-C-S.com. They have a nice WordPress builder there that will help you get your business up fast. And it’s drag and drop. I’ve used it, it’s a good service. You would benefit from it. Mykola, thanks again for coming on the show.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Thanks Matt. And have a good time.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. All right, that’s enough pause to end it. So, what did you think?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Pretty good. I liked some of your questions. I liked the tips question and some of the immigrant-related questions. I think it’s pretty good.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, I neglected to get the questions over to you. One of the other questions I like to ask are five products that have changed your life. Because I feel like we all have products that we use in our daily life that help us go fast and help us be efficient. Where maybe we don’t have a chance to really share that with the world so much.

Mykola Bashlakov:
So the products that I value the most?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah.

Mykola Bashlakov:
So, I would say that probably would go for Zoho. The Zoho Suite.

Matt Gerchow:
Oh, and it doesn’t have to be software.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, of course. I’m going to go for, I’ve got five different products, right?

Matt Gerchow:
Yep.

Mykola Bashlakov:
So I’d say one would be Zoho. It’s a very good suite of business software. They offer it for $35, $35 a month per user for an entire suite. All top notch editions, you’ve got terabyte storage space, mail, CRM, BI, project management, and a whole bunch of other software that I think is excellent.

Actually, I’ve got another company called [inaudible 00:27:43] that’s a Zoho partner and a Zoho implementation consultant. Where actually I do [inaudible 00:27:52] right now for a client in Ukraine. And I think we’re getting pretty far with it. And I’d say I’m pretty impressed and the client was impressed with that too. So that’s on the software side.

On the hardware side, I would say some more generic thing. Let’s see, a smartphone. It’s not really that specific as mentioning a specific product. But just smartphone in general, I would say it’s just a very good thing. You stay connected. I think it’s great that Apple came out with iPhone and everybody else started creating their own smartphones after that.

What else can I think of? A bike. That’s what I use to go to work.

What else? Skype. Skype and I would say video conferencing in general. Any kind of video conferencing I think has changed the way we do business a lot.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah. There’s a new one coming out called Stride. Are you aware of that?

Mykola Bashlakov:
I haven’t heard of that, no. What’s that?

Matt Gerchow:
So I’m on the waiting list. You should probably get on the waiting list as well. I believe it’s going to replace Skype, in that they just have the whole suite of integrations with it. And it has files, it has images, different attachments all right here on the right, down your screen. Same kind of chat as Skype, but then it has Stripe integration, Trolo integration. I’m sure it’ll work with Zoho, et cetera, et cetera.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Right. I’ll take a look at that.

Matt Gerchow:
I believe it’ll probably replace Skype. But we’ve used Skype up until now.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, I mean, Skype is something hard to get out of.

Matt Gerchow:
It is.

Mykola Bashlakov:
I personally, what I would say we would use. We use Zoho, obviously Zoho chat, Skype, Viber, have you ever heard of Viber?

Matt Gerchow:
Of course. Yeah, Viber’s good.

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s what I use a little bit. Is it Upwork?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Upwork’s good but it’s also expensive. Right?

Matt Gerchow:
I find it really cheap. I think it depends on what you’re used to paying for stuff. But I find it pretty inexpensive compared to what I’ll pay for something here in Austin.

Mykola Bashlakov:
You say Upwork?

Matt Gerchow:
Upwork.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, so they do take about 10% fees they take?

Matt Gerchow:
Oh, you’re saying to be the provider. I’m saying I buy stuff on there.

Mykola Bashlakov:
You buy stuff on Upwork?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah. I buy dev stuff, I buy graphic design, voice overs, audio editing, video editing.

Mykola Bashlakov:
So you’re saying you buy fixed price gigs in there?

Matt Gerchow:
Fixed price. I’ll usually set the price.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Right, right, right. Okay.

Matt Gerchow:
You can’t let someone else set the hourly on you.

Mykola Bashlakov:
I got it, got it, sorry. Because when we use Upwork, we use Upwork for our development staff, our development staff that’s out in Ukraine.

Matt Gerchow:
And that’s tough. We did that before and their fees were cutting into their ability to be competitive too much, so we had to pull it outside.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yep. It’s kind of, yes you have some sort of protection in there, and they do give you a lot of ways to protect yourself from any kind of fraud or any kind of lies or cheating on you. But if you find somebody you can actually trust, somebody who you can converse in their own language with, and my developers are all in Ukraine and I can talk to them in my own language if I need to.

Matt Gerchow:
Yep.

Mykola Bashlakov:
You know, we just pay them directly. We’re not paying for Upwork.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, yeah.

Mykola Bashlakov:
We don’t track their hours, we have our own little time tracking systems and it doesn’t need 8%, they just log their time in there.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah. Listen, man …

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s probably a better thing. What I actually find about a lot of labor outsourcing is there are a lot of firm out in Ukraine, for example, that do provide these kinds of solutions where they have a bunch of developers on staff, and they provide you a part-time or full-time developer and they have a project manager on there. What I’ve found is that they tend to do a worse job than independent freelancers. They tend to charge more and they don’t do as good of a job as the independent guys. Not all independent guys are obviously that good, but you find some independent folks that actually do a good job. If you find a way to excite them with your product, with your project, and then they feel they’re part of something great, they’re going to work enthusiastically. They’re going to work overtime, unpaid, they’re going to do a great job. They’re going to document well, they’re going to talk to you anytime, they’re going to work at 3:00 in the morning their local time. And they will produce better quality work. And of course, because there’s no agency taking any kind of cut or a commission, you end up paying a little less. And they end up getting more as well.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, exactly. Mykola, I’m going to try and squeeze one more interview in before lunch. But thank you so much for your time, man. And I’ll send you the link once this is up on the site.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Surely, surely. Thank you, Matt. So we’re going to see each other on Friday?

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah, that’s the plan. Let’s confirm on Thursday, but I think so. It’s just it’s been a little crazy right now. The plan right now is for you guys to come up here, correct?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Yeah, that’s how it’s been up to this point.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. So, and who’s coming? Was it the three of you, or just you?

Mykola Bashlakov:
My team would like to come. I also have a friend who would like to come with me as well. So, if that’s okay with you.

Matt Gerchow:
Yeah. I mean, the plan was just to have you guys over to kind of see the office and then it kind of grew from there. I’m game for whatever. What’s the date on that? That’s the 13th?

Mykola Bashlakov:
That’s this Friday. I’m going to take a look at what day it’s going to be. So today is the 10th. So yeah, that will be the 13th, correct.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay. Friday the 13th, great. Let’s plan on it.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Okay, all right. So just shoot me a little update on Thursday and I’ll tell you how many of us will be there. So as far as we’ll come to your office first, you talk in there a bit, and then we just go to a little place to have lunch.

Matt Gerchow:
We got a bunch of places within walking distance.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Right, okay.

Matt Gerchow:
Okay?

Mykola Bashlakov:
Great.

Matt Gerchow:
All right. Sounds good.

Mykola Bashlakov:
Perfect. Well, thanks Matt, and I appreciate your time. Thanks.

Matt Gerchow:
All right Mykola, take care. Bye.

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